Art in a State of Mobility

art_in_a_state_of_mobilityMason Gross Presents

Panel Discussion

ART IN A STATE OF MOBILITY

Tuesday, October 25, 2016, 5–7 P.M.

MASON GROSS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

CIVIC SQUARE AUDITORIUM

33 LIVINGSTON AVENUE – NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ

Panelists:

Mirene Arsanios

Mariam Ghani

Daniela Kostova

Modereated by:

Sara Raza

See below for bios

The theme of the panel organized for Fall 2016 is a response to the contemporary situation and discussions around the masses of people moving around the globe. Whether to seek greater economic or social opportunity, global warming or through forced migration due to conflict or persecution, 244 million people migrated across borders in 2015.

In Reflections on Exile Edward Said writes, “Modern Western culture is in large part the work of exiles, émigrés, refugees. In the United States, academic, intellectual, and aesthetic thought is what it is today because of refugees from fascism, communism, and other regimes given to the oppression and expulsion of dissidents.”

Said’s reflections remain accurate in the age of global war today. He describes modern warfare, imperialism, and the quasi-theological ambitions of totalitarian rulers, all of which precisely refer to the current, tragic situation in the Middle East. Said expresses particular interest in the creative character of exile, in that much of life in exile is taken up with compensating for disorienting loss by creating a new world to rule. He observes, “It is not surprising that so many exile seem to be novelists, chess players, political activists and intellectuals.”

Said further relates his observation about the condition of exile to occupations that require a minimal investment in objects, but rather place a great premium on mobility and skill, thereby suggesting that exile is implicitly tied up with movement.

The discussion will be moderated by Sara Raza whose recent show “But A Storm Is Blowing from Paradise” is currently on view at the Guggenheim Museum thru Oct 5, 2016. We hope to bring together three artist with her whose practice address the contemporary notion of mobility on a global scale.

Recommended reading prior to the panel:

What is Freedom by Hannah Arendt

https://grattoncourses.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/hannah-arendt-what-is-freedom.pdf

Reflections on Exile by Edward Said

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~germ43/pdfs/said_reflections.pdf

Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt, a documentary film directed by Ada Ushpiz, …will be screened the week that follows in the spirit of this theme.

Thursday, November 3, 2016, 6:30–8:30 P.M.

Room 110

MASON GROSS SCHOOL OF THE ARTS

CIVIC SQUARE AUDITORIUM

33 LIVINGSTON AVENUE – NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ

Pizza and Popcorn will be served. The screening will be followed by a discussion moderated by Ardele Lister, and joined by some members of the faculty.

Biographies of the Panelists and the Moderator

Sara Raza
is a curator, writer and educator. She is currently the Guggenheim UBS MAP Curator, Middle East and North Africa, based at the Guggenheim Museum in New York. Sara has curated several international exhibitions and projects for biennials and festivals, including Collateral Events at the 55th Venice Biennale (2013). Sara writes for numerous publications and is the longstanding desk editor for West and Central Asia of ArtAsiaPacific magazine.  Formerly, she was the head of education at Yarat Contemporary Art Space, Baku, Azerbaijan, founding head of curatorial programs at Alaan Art Space, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and curator of public programs at Tate Modern, London (2006–8). She earned her MA in Art History and Theory, and BA in English Literature and History of Art from Goldsmiths College, University of London.  Awards include the United Kingdom Arts Council’s Emerging Curator’s Award at the South London Gallery (2004) and winner of the 11th ArtTable New Leadership Award (2016). Sara is an artist adviser for ISCP in New York and the author of Punk Orientalism: Central Asia’s Contemporary Art Revolution, set to be published in 2017 by Black Dog Publishing, London.

Mariam Ghani

is an artist, writer, filmmaker and teacher. Her research-based practice spans video, installation, photography, performance, and text. Her exhibitions and screenings include the Rotterdam, CPH:DOX and transmediale film festivals, the Sharjah and Liverpool Biennials, dOCUMENTA (13) in Kabul and Kassel, MoMA in New York, the National Gallery in DC, the St. Louis Art Museum, and the CCCB in Barcelona. Ghani has collaborated with artist Chitra Ganesh since 2004 on Index of the Disappeared, an experimental archive of post-9/11 detentions, deportations, renditions and redactions; with choreographer Erin Kelly since 2006 on the video series Performed Places; and with media archive collective Pad.ma since 2012 on the Afghan Films online archive. Ghani has been awarded NYFA and Soros Fellowships, grants from Creative Capital, Art Matters, NYSCA, and the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, among others. She holds a B.A. in Comparative Literature from NYU and an MFA from SVA. Ghani currently teaches in the Social Practice MFA program at Queens College and the Film Studies program at the Graduate Center, and is a Visiting Artist at the Schell Center for International Human Rights at Yale Law School.

Daniela Kostova
is an interdisciplinary artist who holds M.F.A. from Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, NY and the National Art Academy in Sofia. Her work is focused on hybrid cultures and architecture, resulted from migrations and changing global socio-cultural conditions. It addresses issues of geography and cultural representation, the production and crossing of socio-cultural borders, and the uneasy process of translation and communication. Kostova has exhibited at venues such as Queens Museum of Art (NY), Institute for Contemporary Art (Sofia), Kunsthalle Wien (Austria), Antakya Biennale (Turkey), Centre d’art Contemporain (Geneva), Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, (Torino) and Kunsthalle Fridericianum (Kassel), among the others. Her work is reviewed in New York Times, Brooklyn Rail, Flash Art International and Art in America. In addition, Kostova curated the BioArt Initiative–art & science project of the Arts Department and the Center for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Studies at RPI. She is also a co-founder of the Bulgarian Collaborative, interdisciplinary collective that includes artists, musicians, literati and architects. Kostova lives and works in NYC. She is the Director of Curatorial Projects at Radiator Gallery and a Board Member of CEC Artslink, New York.

Mirene Arsanios

is a writer who was born in Beirut, Lebanon. She co-founded the collective 98weeks Research Project in Beirut and is the founding editor of Makhzin, a bilingual literary magazine. Her work has appeared in The Animated Reader, The Outpost, and The Rumpus, among others. Arsanios was the recipient of the Enizagam fiction prize (2014), and Forum Fellows, Art Dubai, Dubai, U.A.E (2015). She was an artist-in-residence at the CCA, Warsaw, Poland (2015), and at the Villa Romana, Florence, Italy (2012). Arsanios received her MA from Goldsmiths College, London, and an MFA from the Milton Avery School of the Arts, Bard College. She lives in New York where she is currently a writer-in-residence at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

Guest Lecturers in Typography Class

On Monday, April 18, there will be two guest lecturers in Lauren Francescone’s Typography class in Room 220. Nejc Prah (Bloomberg) and Sean Yendrys (independent designer of architectural books&exhibitions) will be speaking about their work.

These two lectures will be pretty informal; one from 3:30–4:10, the other from 4:30-5:10.

This lecture has been rescheduled to Monday, April 25th! Same time, same place.

“The Winners and Losers of History: The Emergence of Japanese Modernism in Graphic Design”

On Monday evening Jason’s Seminar in Design class will be hosting a guest lecture by Ian Lynam, a Tokyo-based designer, educator, and writer. Ian will be presenting on “The Winners and Losers of History: The Emergence of Japanese Modernism in Graphic Design”. Here are the details and a bio:

Monday, February 1
6:30–8pm
Room 218C

Originally hailing from New York, Lynam has a BS in Graphic Design from Portland State University and an MFA in Graphic Design from CalArts.

Ian Lynam is Chair and faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts in the MFA Graphic Design program. He is faculty in Tokyo at Meme Design School. Ian is also adjunct faculty at Temple University Japan. There, he teaches in the Undergraduate program, actively engaged in developing curricula concerning typography, graphic design, image-making, identity design, UI/UX and motion graphics.

Currently, Ian writes for Idea Magazine(Japan) and Slanted Magazine(Germany). He is a co-founder of Néojaponisme, a critical cultural online journal.
IanLynam-poster

Baskets & Data Making Weather Tactile in the Digital Age

articles_1

Thursday, April 10 / 4pm
Nathalie Miebach, Artist

Miebach discusses her translations of scientific data from the realms of astronomy, ecology, and meteorology into sculpture, installation, and musical scores, while exploring the intersection of art and science. Links to Miebach’s 2011 Ted Talk and the January 2014 issue of American Craft Magazine, featuring a cover article about the artist, are available on her website. This lecture is offered in conjunction with the exhibition Diane Burko: Glacial Perspectives.

Part of the interdisciplinary seminar series Polar Perspectives on Art and Science. The museum’s partners include the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy; Department of Geography; Rutgers Climate Institute; the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences; and the Institute for Women and Art. These partnerships are co-sponsored by the Centers for Global Advancement and International Affairs (GAIA Centers) as part of the 2013-2015 Biennial Theme: “Global Health!”

Free with general admission.

Ignorance

What we know about the world is increasingly shaped by infographics — from the blue state–red state divide to an analysis of history’s best basketball players and a gorgeous portrait of New York City’s Twitter traffic. To launch the debut of a new annual series, The Best American Infographics, editor Gareth Cook explains why this medium is experiencing a golden age and uncovers its deep roots in art, cartography, and the brain’s natural visual intelligence. Several top designers involved in the project — Nicholas Felton, John Grimwade, Nigel Holmes, Fernanda Viégas and Martin Wattenberg — will engage the audience in discussions of some of the works being considered for next year’s volume.

“When infographics work…they take you somewhere no other medium can go; they allow and facilitate intuitive insights; and they reveal the hidden patterns buried in mountains of data.”

— David Byrne, from the Introduction to The Best American Infographics 2013

The program will be followed by a book signing and public reception with many of the winning artists.

About the Speaker
Gareth Cook is the series editor of The Best American Infographics. He is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, a regular contributor to NewYorker.com, and the editor of Mind Matters, Scientific American’s neuroscience blog.

Panel discussion: Interactive Spaces with Project Projects, FXFOWLE, and Alan Brake

Tuesday, May 14th, 6:30–8:00 pm
161 Bowery, 2nd Floor, New York 10002

How does a body interact with a building? How do people interact socially within spaces? How do commissions interact with the design process? How do communities interact with one another? Architecture has long been interested in questions of interaction and new technologies – indeed, many ideas about the development of software have been drawn from ideas about the development of buildings.
Join us Tuesday, May 14th for a panel discussion with Guy Geier and Tim Milam of FXFOWLE, Alan Brake of The Architects’ Newspaper, and Project Projects principals Prem Krishnamurthy and Rob Giampietro, as they explore dimensions of interactivity in design, from analog to digital, and 2-D to 3-D, through a variety of examples drawing from FXFOWLE and Project Projects’ multidisciplinary practices. Case studies will include the newly-launched FXFOWLE.com, designed by Project Projects, along with interactive structures, exhibitions, public spaces, and related media.
Part of NYCxDesign, New York City’s inaugural citywide event to showcase and promote design of all disciplines, the discussion will take place at Project Projects’ studio at
161 Bowery, 2nd Floor, followed by a complimentary cocktail reception at The Randolph
at 343 Broome Street.
To RSVP, contact Emily Alli at ealli@fxfowle.com
We hope to see you there!

Designing Ideologically Modified Organisms

workshop and presentation by

Orkan Telhan
http://orkantelhan.info

February 27, Wednesday 4:00 pm. – 8:00 pm.
CSB 224

Orkan Telhan is interdisciplinary artist, designer and researcher whose investigations focus on the design of interrogative objects, interfaces, and media, engaging with critical issues in social, cultural, and environmental responsibility.

Telhan is Assistant Professor of Fine Arts – Emerging Design Practices at University of Pennsylvania, School of Design. He was part of the Sociable Media Group at the MIT Media Laboratory and the Mobile Experience Lab at the MIT Design Laboratory. He studied Media Arts at the State University of New York at Buffalo and theories of media and representation, visual studies and graphic design at Bilkent University, Ankara. Telhan is working towards his PhD in Design and Computation at MIT’s Department of Architecture.

Telhan’s individual and collaborative work has been exhibited in a number of venues including the Istanbul Design Biennial, Ars Electronica, ISEA, LABoral, Archilab, Architectural Association, Architectural League/ NYC, and the MIT Museum.

Suggested reading before the event:
I. States of Design 07: Bio-design by Paola Antonelli
http://www.domusweb.it/en/design/states-of-design-07-bio-design-/

II.Catts, O., Zurr, I. 2010, ‘The Illusions of control Radical Engineers and Reactionary Artists’, Thresholds (Cambridge), NA, pp. 26

III. Calvert, Jane. 2010. “Synthetic biology: constructing nature?” The Sociological Review 58 (May 1): 95-112.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-954X.2010.01913.x/abstract

for further inquiries please write to: Atif Akin
poster and e-flier designed by James Brehm.

PARSONS LECTURE SERIES THE NEW FUTURE OF DESIGN @ AIGA/NY

TIME AND PLACE
Wednesday 12 December 2012
6:30–8:30PM
Tishman Auditorium – Parsons 66 West 12th Street New York, NY 10016
6:30-7:00PM Doors open & check-in 7:00-8:30PM Presentation & Discussion

What does design look like in the future? The outcomes that once defined us (print, branding, packaging…etc.) have expanded in the digital age, to include web, motion, UX and a growing list of others. But what happens when technology moves beyond the screen to merge with the physical world? What happens when our tools grow to include not just computers, but 3-D printing, open-source engineering and everything else? Join us as we meet a few of the talented designers who offer a glimpse into this future, revealing the possibilities of tomorrow’s designer.
On December 12th at Parsons, we’ll hear from Zach Lieberman, who created a font with a car, invented a way for paralyzed artists to draw using their eye movements—and created a way for that art to live in the physical world. We’ll meet James Bridle, who mapped a neighborhood using balloons, illustrated military drones in a surprising way, and coined the term ‘The New Aesthetic’—describing the visual language of our merging digital and physical space. Carla Diana—who designs domestic robots, sentient kitchen appliances and most-anything that intersects the physical and digital spaces—will reveal how she tries to live as close to the near future as possible.
The evening will be moderated by Liz Danzico, who—through her work—and as chair and co-founder of interaction design at the School of Visual Arts, leads a new generation of designers to the future possibilities of our field.
PANELISTS
JAMES BRIDLE
Is a writer, artist, publisher and technologist, usually based in London, UK. His work covers the intersection of literature, culture and the network.
Coined the term “The New Aesthetic”
Writer for Wired, the Atlantic, ICON, Domus and others
Regular columnist for the Observer newspaper
Frequent lecturer including TED, SXSW, Lift, Web Directions, Tools of Change, dConstruct and FutureEverything
2012 Happenstance resident at Lighthouse Gallery
CARLA DIANA
Founder of the Smart Interaction Lab
Consultant for Smart Design focused on interaction for physical products
Artist in Residence for the Museum of Art and Design’s Open Studio
Museum of Fine Arts Houston Brown Foundation Fellow
Creator of “Smart Objects” courses at SVA and U. Penn and frequent lecturer on Design and Technology
Writer for Fast Company Co.Design, Interactions Magazine and Core77
In 2008 the New York Times Magazine’s called Carla an “alpha geek”
ZACH LIEBERMAN
Is an artist with a simple goal: he wants you surprised. His work uses technology in a playful way to break down the fragile boundary between the visible and the invisible.
One of the co-founders of openFrameworks
Faculty member in the Parsons MFA Design and Technology program
Currently working on the EyeWriter project, a low-cost, open source hardware and software toolkit that helps people draw with their eyes.
Named one of the “100 Creative People in Business” by Fast Company Magazine, 2010
Design of the year, Interactive from the London Design Museum for Eyewriter
Golden Nica, Interactive from Ars Electronica for Eyewriter
MODERATOR
LIZ DANZICO
is part designer, part educator, and part editor.
Co-founder and chair of the MFA in Interaction Design program at the School of Visual Arts
Independent consultant for global companies and a frequent lecturer
Advisory board member for organizations including the Center for Urban Pedagogy, desigNYC, and Weeksville Heritage Center
Collaborations include The New York Times, This American Life, MIT Technology Review, The TED Prize, and Teach for All
Writer for Eye Magazine, FortuneMagazine, Interactions Magazine, bobulate.com and others
Thesis advisor in the graduate design program at the Rhode Island School of Design, former adjunct faculty at the New School University and the Fashion Institute of Technology, and lectured at schools from Columbia University to MICA: Maryland Institute College of Art

NEUROMEDIA: The Intersection of Art and Science

Visiting Artist: Dr. Jill Scott
Thursday Dec. 6, 2012

Reception: 5 pm CSB lobby
Presentation: 6:40 CSB 110/117

The Electric Retina is a “neuromedia” sculpture which combines retinal research with interactive media art and metaphorical associations in order to explore the complexity of visual perception. Based on her residency in Neurobiology at the Institute of Zoology, University of Zurich, Scott gained a deeper insight into the genetic control of visual system development and function by analysis of zebra fish mutants, which are used as the main phenotypes for human eye disease research. While the Electric Retina displays examples from some of this research at the lab, its surface is constructed according to the rod and cone pattern array of photoreceptors in the human retina inspired directly from the Scanning Electronic Microscope. When the viewer looks into the “cones” or oculars, animations appear about the histological evidence, behaviour tests, molecular staining, cellular research images and related keywords from the researchers. The issues covered are macular degeneration, human diseases of the eye, genetic deficiencies and polarization. It is as if the viewers are looking through the tunnels into the neural chemical layers of the eye. From the other side of the sculpture, films of underwater movies are projected onto the wall. These are shot from the perspective of the impaired subject, which shows how visual impairment can affect neural behaviour. Therefore the projected films (affect) are directly related to the content of these ocular films (evidence) and aim is to allow the general public to gain a better understanding of how vision is affected by genetics, disease and degeneration.

The media artist Jill Scott has created the neuromedia sculpture “The Electric Retina” during her residency at the Neuroscience Lab University Zurich, Switzerland. The Artists-in-Labs program offers 4 annual residencies in Swiss science labs to artists. Scott initiated the program and is its director. Currently the docu is also shown in Singapore at the ISEA, an electronic arts festival. The film maker Anet Nyffeler directed this docu and currently develops a TV-documentary on the subject ArtSci and this specific program. Transdisciplinarity is a current overall development in the arts and science.

“True knowledge exists in knowing that you know nothing!” -Socrates Conceptual art requires a subjective approach and the process of discovery is often evident in the final artwork that is produced. The aim of Neuromedia is to explore how conceptual art interpretations and scientific illustrations of the human body can be combined to transfer information about how we think and how our senses work together. While Scott makes unique screen based sculptures embedded with macroscopic views of molecular and cellular evidence, over the last few years, the increasingly popular subject of Neuroscience offers many artists a reality that is now considered to be an “extension of cinema”. After all, perceptual feedback loops are at the heart of both disciplines, a fact that is causing more collaboration between artists and neuroscientists to occur. What is the value of these collaborations? Are the results are objective and subjective at the same time? Under the headings of “inspirations, constructions, challenges and reactions” can Neuromedia not only humanize science but also deepen the tangible and experiential experience of art itself?

BIOGRAPHY Jill Scott is originally from Australia, but has been working and living in Switzerland since 2003. Currently she is a Professor for Art and Science in the Institute Cultural Studies in the Arts, at the Zurich University of the Arts (ZhdK) in Zürich and Co-Director and Founder of the Artists-in-Labs Program (a collaboration with the Ministry for Culture, Switzerland) which places artists from all disciplines into physics, computer, engineering and life science labs to learn about scientific research and make creative interpretations. She is also Vice Director of the Z-Node PHD program on art and science at the University of Plymouth, UK-a program with 16 international research candidates. Her recent publications include: The Transdiscourse book series: Volume 1: Mediated Environments, 2011, Artists-in-labs: Networking in the Margins, 2011 and Artists-in-labs: Processes of Inquiry: 2006 Springer/Vienna/New York, Artists-in-labs Processes of Inquiry both from Springer/Vienna/New York. Her education includes: PhD, University of Wales (UK), MA USF, San Francisco, as well as a Degree in Education (Univ. Melbourne) and a Degree in Art and Design (Victoria College of the Arts). Since 1975, she has exhibited many video artworks, conceptual performances and interactive environments in USA, Japan, Australia and Europe. A monograph entitled: Coded Characters Hatje Cantz 2002, Ed. Her most recent art works involve the construction of interactive media and electronic sculptures based on studies she has conducted in residence in neuroscience labs at the University of Zurich, called “Neuromedia” (a Springer Publication in conjunction with an exhibition of the same name in KULTURAMA Science Musuem in Zurich). These particularly relate to the somatic sensory system and artificial skin (e-skin) 2003-2007, molecular and retinal behaviour in relation to human eye disease (The Electric Retina-2008), nerve damage in relation to UV radiation, in the skin and on the landscape (Dermaland- 2009) and Somabook (2010) about the problems in the development of neural networks in the pre-natal stage. Currently, she is working on two new projects about the neural systems of hearing and taste, inspired by a residency with neuroscientists at SymbioticA, University of Western Australia.

Superstorm Sandy: Response and Recovery

How can design offer solutions and pathways for prevention, recovery and rebuilding efforts in the wake of Superstorm Sandy? Join Cynthia E. Smith, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum’s Curator of Socially Responsible Design, and representatives from Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Architecture for Humanity-NY, Brightbox, and Solar One as they discuss the effects from the superstorm for the city and the east coast.

Date: Thursday, December 13, 2012 – 6:30pm to 8:00pm
Venue: Cooper-Hewitt Design Center, 111 Central Park North

http://www.cooperhewitt.org/events/superstorm-sandy-response-and-recovery

Digital Art History

Digital Art History (November 30 – December 1, 2012)
Organized by Jim Coddington



Live streaming by Ustream

The impact of digital technology on the practice of the humanities has been a subject of considerable discussion, debate and even consternation. In the context of art history the integration of digital tools and processes has lagged, in varying degrees, in comparison to other disciplines like archaeology and literary studies. Some approaches have been fruitful, such as computational subjects like image processing for technical art history, virtual environments, visualization, use of GIS data in archaeology and others.

http://www.nyu.edu/gsas/dept/fineart/research/mellon/mellon-digital.htm

Presenting Data and Information: A One-Day Course Taught by Edward Tufte

http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/

Topics covered in this one-day course include: How to make effective, credible presentations. Fundamental strategies of analytical design. Evaluating evidence used in presentations. Statistical data: tables, graphics, semigraphics. Business, scientific, research, and financial presentations. Complexity and clarity. Interface design. Use of PowerPoint, video, handouts. Design for websites, animations, scientific visualizations. Many practical examples.

Edward Tufte teaches the entire course. Each student receives all four ET books on information design.

Art In Your Pocket

September 21, 2012 7 pm.

The computer we carry in our pockets is also an emerging platform for interactive screen-based art. Art In Your Pocket takes its name from a series of texts Jonah Brucker-Cohen wrote for Rhizome on art made for smartphones. This panel will assemble leading media artists working with mobile devices and discuss current trends relating to this practice.

http://www.newmuseum.org/calendar/view/art-in-your-pocket

You might want to take a look at artsy before coming.

Graphic Design – The Final Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eventbrite Page

During the final weekend of the exhibition “Graphic Design—Now In Production” on Governors Island, come talk with some of the field’s leading practitioners about life, death, and visual communications. Hear about how new and old media are changing how designers work; commiserate on the loss of some of the world’s greatest logotypes; and celebrate the birth of new design methods and talents.

Speakers include:
Keetra Dean Dixon and JK Keller
Elliott Earls
The Stone Twins
Alicia Cheng and Sarah Gephart, MGMT Design
Daniel van der Velden, Metahaven
Farhad Fozouni
Free ferries from Manhattan and Brooklyn:

http://govisland.com/html/visit/directions.shtml

Please travel on the 1:00pm ferry in order to arrive in time to be seated for the event at 2:00pm.

Not Amazing and not Groundbreaking but Really Very Decently Good Typography

Friday, June 1st
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

A Talk at the Cooper Union, NYC

This is sure to be a fantastic talk from a smart and talented designer, co-author of “Graphic Design Referenced” and the blog Under Consideration.
The cost is $15 for student non-TDC members.
Grab your design friends/classmates and head to New York for this not-to-be-missed event!