Publication Intensive

60127fb1-291d-4ef0-a9ac-2242f3f4a948

Application
Please apply via our online form, here. The deadline for applications is midnight on Monday, April 11, 2016. Participants will be notified no later than Friday, April 15. If you have further questions, please write edu@canopycanopycanopy.com. Read a conversation between participants in 2014’s program here.

What: A two-week program in the history and contemporary practice of publication.

Where: At Triple Canopy’s offices in Brooklyn and various arts spaces around New York City.

Cost: Tuition is free, though participants must arrange and pay for their travel and accommodation. All reading and viewing materials will be provided free of cost.

Triple Canopy is pleased to announce its second Publication Intensive, a two-week program in the history and contemporary practice of publication, for twelve higher-level college students, graduate students, and recent college graduates. We invite applications from prospective students with backgrounds in areas such as writing, art, literature, art history, new media, and design. During the Publication Intensive, Triple Canopy editors and invited artists, writers, and technologists will lead discussions and workshops with participating students, who will research, analyze, and enact an approach to publication that hinges on today’s networked forms of production and circulation but also mines the history of print culture and artistic practice. The program will take place at Triple Canopy’s venue in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and will include visits to studios of artists and designers, archives, and cultural institutions.

Dear Design Student

by Juliette Cezzar

on deardesignstudent.com

Why is so much of design school a waste of time?
Q: My teacher hates everything I make, even though I spend all this time working on it, and gets mad even when I follow his advice. Sometimes designers who are working come to talk to us, but they never get what I’m trying to do. There’s all this useless talking when they should just teach us things. Should I just quit school and go work somewhere? I feel like this is a waste of time.
Dear design student,
Sure, you can leave, but you’re going to take your inability to use criticism with you. And then you will be back here in about six months asking why your clients keep getting in your way or whether or not you should go find a better job with smarter people. So my advice is that if you can, stay where you are for as long as it takes for you to figure this out. You don’t have to go to school to figure out how to give and receive criticism, but it’s mostly what happens in school, so it’s a good place to practice.
I was terrible at it, so I didn’t even begin to figure it out until I was halfway through graduate school. Critics would come up from New York and the most I could get out of them were expressions of sympathy or open frustration. They would get away as soon as it was politely possible and sneak back to the desk of my then best friend and mortal enemy, scribbling down their phone numbers and breathlessly asking if they could talk more with him later.
This made no sense to me. Especially early on, his work was half-baked and sometimes awful. But over two years, he became ten times the designer he was when he started, while I was pretty much in the same place. And I watched him do it. When people came to his desk, everything about his expression and body language said “tell me more,” as if the critic was spoon-feeding him ice cream rather than telling him everything that was wrong with his work. As for me, I was set on being me, which meant tearing the work apart before anyone else could, offering up detailed excuses to fill the time, and arguing with my critics, building my case that I was smarter than them anyway, since they clearly didn’t get what I was doing. And I spent the rest of my time complaining that maaaybe ten percent of what they said was useful, when in my mind, the yield should have been far closer to one hundred percent.
So here’s the secret that I didn’t put into practice until after I graduated: you’re a gold miner, not a customer, and if you don’t get good at mining for gold, you will never be a good designer. Especially once you make it past the first year or two of working, you spend less time wrestling with making things and more time listening to people in person, on the phone, in slack, in texts, in email, pretty much everywhere where they can find you. They are redundant, inarticulate, inefficient, vague, and inconsistent, and they are constantly going on and on about something. And god bless them. They don’t owe you clarity. If ten percent of what they say is useful, that’s a win. Your job as a student is to practice figuring out which ten percent is useful, how to mine it, and how to use it. This is what school is for. If you want to learn how to use digital tools, talk to the internet.
You’re also thinking here that success in a critique means that people like what you made, and that success in the next critique is showing how obedient you are in following their suggestions. You’re missing the point. It’s a gift exchange, not an oral exam, and if you don’t get past this in school, you will be condemned to repeat it after you leave. You’ll go to one client meeting and walk out mad that they didn’t like what you made, then you’ll grumpily make their suggestions real and bring them in for the next round, and get mad again when they still don’t like it. You will complain to your friends about “pushing pixels” and how dumb clients are. And you will be as good a designer at 32 as you were at 22, maybe slightly worse.
You have to let go of sorting people into “good” people who like what you do and “bad” people who don’t, and you have to start to seek out people who don’t see things exactly as you do. The hero in your life is never going to be the person who pats you on the head: it’s going to be the person who puts their own need to be liked aside to make you a better designer. And no, someone doesn’t need to understand you or your project 100% before they have the right to say anything about it. The person who doesn’t get you or what you made is the one that is most likely to come up with the idea or the insight that you can’t come up with on your own. People who see things differently are gold.
So next time someone is giving you feedback about something you made, think to yourself that to win means getting two or three insights, ideas, or suggestions that you are excited about, and that you couldn’t think up on your own. Lead the conversation until you get there. Ask real questions that tell you something that you didn’t know already. Say “tell me more.” Let them wander, tell stories, not understand, be irrelevant — take as long as it takes to listen for the pieces that make you better.
And if they are hard on you, keep coming back to them. As my favorite client once said to someone working for him, “Is this it? Is this as good as you want to be? Are you done? Because if you are done, and you don’t want to be any better, I can stop talking. But if you’re not, I’m here for you.”

Juliette Cezzar is a designer, educator, and author based in New York City. She is currently the Associate Director of BFA Communication Design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design and President of AIGA/NY. Her most recent book, with Sue Apfelbaum, is Designing the Editorial Experience.

New MOOC Introduces You to the Wonderful World of Infographics and Data Visualization

Hans Rosling, a professor of global health at Sweden’s Karolinska Institute, became something of an internet celebrity because of his knack for presenting data in extremely imaginative ways. As you’ll see above, he’s the master of data visualization. Now, thanks to a new MOOC from the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin, you can develop some of these skills yourself. The free course, Introduction to Infographics and Data Visualization, begins on January 12th and runs 6 weeks. The course is not taught by Rosling (sigh), but the current version of the course has drawn more than 2,000 people from 109 countries. Introduction to Infographics and Data Visualization has been added to our collection of our Complete List of MOOCs and Certificate Courses.

Hans Rosling sequence from info@flocklondon.com on Vimeo.

http://www.openculture.com/2012/11/new_mooc_introduces_you_to_the_wonderful_world_of_infographics_data_visualization.html

Undergraduate Annual exhibition – Open Call for Art Work 2012

Here is a message from Amee:

Undergraduate Annual exhibition – Open Call for Art Work 2012

You are invited to submit one work on the theme of “Systems”.
(You can find great examples for inspiration in the Zimmerli’s group show “Art=Text=Art” and the work of Ruth Vollmer, who used mathematics and the Fibonnacci series/sequence to produce her abstract sculpture.)

Both BA and BFA students are encouraged to submit one piece each; all are accepted.

The exhibition will be on view from Monday, October 29th  – Tuesday, November 13th, 2012.

The opening reception is Wednesday, October 31st, from 5-7pm.

The show will be curated and installed by the BFA Thesis class (Section 1) and participating students should bring their artwork to the Visual Arts office from Monday, October 15th – Thursday, October 18th between the hours of 10am-5pm.

SUBMITTING IS EASY:
1)      Fill out the two attached labels completely.
2)      Turn in one copy to a Supervising Graduate Student in the Visual Arts Dept. Office (CSB124) and attach the other to the artwork being submitted.
3)      After label has been submitted to the office, take art work up to the third-floor crit room where it will be stored until the exhibition is installed.

Let’s make a great show!

Amee Pollack
Undergraduate Program Coordinator, Visual Arts
Mason Gross School of the Arts

National Design Week: October 13–21, 2012

http://www.cooperhewitt.org/national-design-awards/ndw

Mark your calendars for Cooper-Hewitt’s largest education initiative! National Design Week aims to draw national attention to the ways in which design enriches everyday life.

Launched in 2006, National Design Week is held each year in conjunction with the National Design Awards program. During National Design Week, Cooper-Hewitt’s award-winning Education Department hosts a series of free public programs based on the vision and work of the National Design Awards honorees. National Design Week culminates with the National Design Awards gala ceremony.

In recognition of the importance of design education, organizations and institutions across the country sponsor design events throughout the month.

Presenting Data and Information: A One-Day Course Taught by Edward Tufte

http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/

Topics covered in this one-day course include: How to make effective, credible presentations. Fundamental strategies of analytical design. Evaluating evidence used in presentations. Statistical data: tables, graphics, semigraphics. Business, scientific, research, and financial presentations. Complexity and clarity. Interface design. Use of PowerPoint, video, handouts. Design for websites, animations, scientific visualizations. Many practical examples.

Edward Tufte teaches the entire course. Each student receives all four ET books on information design.

New Books Arrived to Cabinet in Room 218


Saul Bass: A Life in Film and Design
Grid Systems in Graphic Design/Raster Systeme Fur Die Visuele Gestaltung (German and English Edition)
The Visual Display of Quantitative Information
Visual Explanations: Images and Quantities, Evidence and Narrative
Art of the Digital Age
Network Art
Graphic Design: A User’s Manual
Visual Strategies
Arduino Cookbook
Processing
Inventing the Medium
Beautiful Visualization
Graphic Design New Basics
Processing
S, M, L, XL
Visualize This
Form + Code
Wayshowing
Information Graphics

One Day Video Mapping Workshop

One Day Video Mapping Workshop from Atif Akin on Vimeo.

In the academic year of 2011 – 2012 at Rutgers University Mason Gross School of the Arts / Design Area, made this video mapping workshop with the students listed below. The course is taught by myself.
The workshop was in the format of an in-class exercise, starting in the morning and presenting the works by the end of the day. Students from the design area worked in groups of 3 or 4 and locations are chosen in and around the CSB of Mason Gross in New Brunswick
The soundtrack is borrowed from the album titled “Monthly Joint Series” by Amon Tobin.
Christine Tynes
Geraldson Chua
Christine Huang
Stephen Bondio
Jenny Hang
Ting Ting Ku
Melissa Mendoza
Sharanya Durvasula
Stephen Churak
Sara Nagy
Lauren Jastrebski
Salvatore Forgione
Kylie Coghlan
Cormac McCrathy
Micheal Cunningham
Kelly Kathryn
Felipe Rojas
Jenny Hui
Denzel Seals
Jaemin Kim
Kumiko Taura
Larissa Louis
Daniel Winistorfer
Michelle Coraci
Franki Vicini
Nicole Testa
Sefton Bass
Jessica Gluck
Mark Hansen
Kevin Hau
Brynne Kelly
Michael Leboeuf
Zachary Manning
Dorie Schatteman
Jillian Sollazzo
Derek Springsteen
De Anna Stephan
Hakan Uzumcu
Alfred Auyeung
Nicholas Black
Stephen Bondio
James Brehm
Maria Carney
Nicholas Di Pillo
Alyssa Esteban
Emily Heinemann
Victor Hernandez
Lauren Jastrebski
Yelizaveta Kotik
Erica Lai
Austin Lee
Angela Liang
Christophe Moore
Danit Weiner
Allyson Worthington
Andrew Schnur