Bunker Gallery

OPENING MARCH 3

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BUNKER is a pop up art gallery specializing in emerging artists who create engaging, beautiful work that often involves technology.

BUNKER operates under the assumption that art doesn’t have to be inaccessible and pretentious in order to be valuable.

BUNKER is a gallery for people who hate technology but love art.

BUNKER is a gallery for people who love technology but hate art.

BUNKER is curated by GABEBC

Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game extended

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Film stills courtesy of the Herbert Matter World Game Archive at Stanford University Libraries.
Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game extended
September 18—November 20, 2015

Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery
Buell Hall, Columbia University GSAPP
1172 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027
Hours: Monday–Friday noon–6pm, Saturday 3–6pm

Columbia GSAPP Exhibitions presents Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game, an exhibition at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation.

Initially proposed for Expo 67 in Montréal, Buckminster Fuller’s World Game was played for the first time in 1969 at the New York Studio School for Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture. Over the next decade, the World Game evolved and expanded through workshops, seminars, strategy papers, and building designs. Across its different manifestations, the World Game remained focused on the goals of overcoming energy scarcity and altering conventional territorial politics through the redistribution of world resources. This anti-Malthusian, anti-war game was meant to discover conditions for perpetual ecological peace and to usher in a new era of total global resource consciousness. Mirroring Cold War command and control infrastructures, proposals for World Game centers described a vast computerized network that could process, map, and visualize environmental information drawn from, among other sources, Russian and American spy satellites. Fuller claimed that their optical sensors and thermographic scanners could detect the location and quantity of water, grain, metals, livestock, human populations, or any other conceivable form of energy. Among Fuller’s abiding obsessions was the limited range of the electromagnetic spectrum available to human vision. Fuller argued that the World Game would serve as a corrective to this limitation by rendering visible global environmental data patterns that evaded normal perception.

Assembling documents related to various iterations of the World Game conceived, proposed, and played from 1964 to 1982 along with materials from the World Resources Inventory, the exhibition examines the World Game as an experimental pedagogical project, as a system for environmental information, and as a process of resource administration. A related symposium will bring together scholars and architects with Fuller partners and collaborators to speak about the World Game in relation to its ecological, informational vision, and to the current stakes for environmental data and its representation.

The exhibition is curated and designed by Mark Wasiuta, Director of Exhibitions and Co-Director of the Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture Program, and Adam Bandler, Exhibitions Coordinator at Columbia GSAPP. Florencia Alvarez Pacheco is assistant curator.

For more information, please send an email to exhibitions@arch.columbia.edu.

The Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP), provides a platform for developing original curatorial projects and for experimenting with the spatial distribution and visual organization of research material. The gallery is simultaneously a testing ground for exploring new approaches to architectural exhibitions, and a space for considering and analyzing architecture as it has been formed through exhibition. Its exhibition program follows several distinct series. “The Living Archive” interrogates and exposes important and underexamined architectural archives, while other exhibitions resulting from collaboration with contemporary artists, architects, and scholars aim to provide models for novel forms of architectural speculation and spatial practice.

Bierut Show in NYC — Must See Before Nov 7!

4bee4a955263218a2579d6e0a1e7b03dd57b47cbMake sure to see Graphic designer Michael Bierut’s exhibition at the SVA Chelsea Galleries, up now through Nov 7. You will see a coherent body of thoughtful work, including logos, visual identity systems, posters, books, way-finding and building signage, as well as pages from the designer’s sketchbook, a video interview and a roomful of black-and-white posters for the Yale School of Architecture. Absolutely gorgeous! Read an interview with the designer here.

CENTURY: 100 YEARS OF TYPE IN DESIGN

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May 1, 2014-June 18, 2014

On view at the AIGA National Design Center (May 1–June 18)
Interest in type, typefaces, typography and fonts has grown far beyond the graphic design community, yet few truly understand how and why these vital components of design are created and applied. This exhibition, organized by Monotype and designed by AIGA Medalist and Pentagram partner Abbott Miller for the AIGA National Design Center, celebrates 100 years of type as a constant influence in the world around us.

Gathering rare and unique works from premier archives in the United States and London, “Century” will serve as the hub of a series of presentations, workshops and events held at the AIGA gallery as well as the Type Directors Club and the Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography at Cooper Union in New York City. The “Century” exhibition features a range of artifacts representing the evolution from typeface conception to fonts in use. Typeface production drawings by the preeminent designers of the last 100 years, proofs, type posters and announcement broadsides are supplemented by publications, advertising, ephemera and packaging.

Visible Time

Explore “This Exquisite Forest” with Chrome and London’s Tate Modern

This morning, in partnership with the Tate Modern in London, Google released an online art experiment called This Exquisite Forest, which lets you collaborate with others to create animations and stories using a web-based drawing tool.

It is so disappointing that it requires Chrome.

http://www.exquisiteforest.com

Graphic Design – The Final Hours

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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During the final weekend of the exhibition “Graphic Design—Now In Production” on Governors Island, come talk with some of the field’s leading practitioners about life, death, and visual communications. Hear about how new and old media are changing how designers work; commiserate on the loss of some of the world’s greatest logotypes; and celebrate the birth of new design methods and talents.

Speakers include:
Keetra Dean Dixon and JK Keller
Elliott Earls
The Stone Twins
Alicia Cheng and Sarah Gephart, MGMT Design
Daniel van der Velden, Metahaven
Farhad Fozouni
Free ferries from Manhattan and Brooklyn:

http://govisland.com/html/visit/directions.shtml

Please travel on the 1:00pm ferry in order to arrive in time to be seated for the event at 2:00pm.

Chicago Design Museum

June 1 – June 30, 2012

By any chance if you find yourself in Chicago, The Chicago Design Museum is open from June 1-30, 2012, in a 6,000 sq./ft. location in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood. CHIDM will host five exhibitions drawn from local, domestic and international sources. CHIDM will also be hosting events for students and professionals, presented within the context of our curated exhibitions. There is no fee to attend the museum, but there is a suggested $10 donation per visit.

The Chicago Design Museum hosts limited engagement exhibitions that focus on design excellence. It adapts to curated collections, and finds the appropriate environment for the work on display. The formality of a traditional museum is still found within the high standards of the curated work, while the pop-up format promotes intimate experiences that are less likely to be found in a brick-and-mortar institution.

The Chicago Design Museum is a collaborative effort between Mark Dudlik and Tanner Woodford, and is part of Lost Creature: a non-profit 501(c)(3) that aims to bridge culture and creativity with community projects.

Graphic Design—Now in Production

May 26 – Sept 3, 2012

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Open weekends and holiday Mondays, 10am to 6pm
Building 110, Governors Island, New York. (Directions and free ferry schedule)

Free Admission.
Co-organized by Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and the Walker Art Center, Graphic Design—Now in Production explores some of the most vibrant sectors and genres of graphic design today.

The rise of user-generated content, alternative methods of printing and distribution, and the wide dissemination of creative software have opened up new opportunities for design. Featuring works produced since 2000, Graphic Design explores the worlds of design-driven magazines, newspapers, books, and posters; the expansion of branding programs for corporations, subcultures and nations; the entrepreneurial spirit of designer-produced goods; the renaissance in digital typeface design; the storytelling potential of film and television titling sequences; and the transformation of raw data into compelling information narratives.

Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language

May 6 – August 27, 2012

The exhibition is divided into two sections, with the first featuring an abbreviated timeline of language in modern art culled primarily from drawings, sculptures, prints, books, and sound works from MoMA’s collection. Artists in this historical section of the exhibition include: Carl Andre, Marcel Broodthaers, Henri Chopin, Marcel Duchamp, Ian Hamilton Finlay, John Giorno, Kitasono Katue, Ferdinand Kriwet, Liliane Lijn, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Bruce Nauman, Lawrence Weiner, and others. Artists in the contemporary section of the exhibition include: Ei Arakawa/Nikolas Gambaroff, Tauba Auerbach, Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey), Trisha Donnelly, Shannon Ebner, Paul Elliman, Experimental Jetset, Sharon Hayes, Karl Holmqvist, Paulina Olowska, Adam Pendleton, and Nora Schultz. The exhibition is accompanied by a publication designed and produced by Dexter Sinister.

The Happy Show by Stefan Sagmeister

April 4 – August 12, 2012

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister not only tests the boundary between art and design, he often transgresses it through his imaginative implementation of typography. Filling the Institute of Contemporary Art’s (ICA) entire second-floor galleries and Ramp, and activating the in-between spaces of the museum,The Happy Show offers visitors the experience of walking into the designer’s mind as he attempts to increase his happiness via mediation, cognitive therapy, and mood-altering pharmaceuticals. “I am usually rather bored with definitions,” Sagmeister says. “Happiness, however, is just such a big subject that it might be worth a try to pin it down.” Centered around the designer’s ten-year exploration of happiness, this exhibition presents typographic investigations of a series of maxims, or rules to live by, originally culled from Sagmeister’s diary, manifested in a variety of imaginative and interactive forms. The Happy Showopens on Wednesday, April 4, 2012 with a reception from 6–8pm, and will remain on view through August 12, 2012.