One Day Video Mapping Workshop

 

One Day Video Mapping Workshop from Atif Akin on Vimeo.

In the academic year of 2011 – 2012 at Rutgers University Mason Gross School of the Arts / Design Area, made this video mapping workshop with the students listed below. The course is taught by myself.
The workshop was in the format of an in-class exercise, starting in the morning and presenting the works by the end of the day. Students from the design area worked in groups of 3 or 4 and locations are chosen in and around the CSB of Mason Gross in New Brunswick
The soundtrack is borrowed from the album titled “Monthly Joint Series” by Amon Tobin.
Christine Tynes
Geraldson Chua
Christine Huang
Stephen Bondio
Jenny Hang
Ting Ting Ku
Melissa Mendoza
Sharanya Durvasula
Stephen Churak
Sara Nagy
Lauren Jastrebski
Salvatore Forgione
Kylie Coghlan
Cormac McCrathy
Micheal Cunningham
Kelly Kathryn
Felipe Rojas
Jenny Hui
Denzel Seals
Jaemin Kim
Kumiko Taura
Larissa Louis
Daniel Winistorfer
Michelle Coraci
Franki Vicini
Nicole Testa
Sefton Bass
Jessica Gluck
Mark Hansen
Kevin Hau
Brynne Kelly
Michael Leboeuf
Zachary Manning
Dorie Schatteman
Jillian Sollazzo
Derek Springsteen
De Anna Stephan
Hakan Uzumcu
Alfred Auyeung
Nicholas Black
Stephen Bondio
James Brehm
Maria Carney
Nicholas Di Pillo
Alyssa Esteban
Emily Heinemann
Victor Hernandez
Lauren Jastrebski
Yelizaveta Kotik
Erica Lai
Austin Lee
Angela Liang
Christophe Moore
Danit Weiner
Allyson Worthington
Andrew Schnur

Karel Martens

 

Karel Martens from Submarine Channel on Vimeo.

Evoking meaning, rather than boldly presenting truth: this is the essence of typographer Karel Martens’ work. To achieve this he likes to experiment with numbers, abstract figures and vivid colors.
During the seventies Karel Martens worked for SUN, a socialist publisher led by a group of highly motivated individuals. He succeeded in giving all their publications a very distinctive appearance.
Martens has been teaching throughout most of his career. Like for instance here at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem.
CREDITS
Commissioning editor: Geert van de Wetering, Producer: Olivia Sophie van Leeuwen, Produced by Submarine, Femke Wolting & Bruno Felix Commissioned by DutchDFA, Research: Liselotte Francken, Director: Geert van de Wetering Camera: Wiro Felix, Pierre Rezus, Sound: Steven van Dijk, Editor: Geert van de Wetering, Colorcorrection: Maurik de Ridder, Music Sound Design: Pastelle Music

This is Display

www.thisisdisplay.org

Display is a curated collection of important modern, mid 20th century graphic design books, periodicals, advertisements and ephemera. Documenting, preserving and providing public access to these original materials will raise the profile of Graphic Design as a source of educational, historical and scholarly analysis for teachers, students, designers and independent researchers. From the rational to the experimental to the playful – our collection is varied and represents a distinct point of view about mid-century graphic design, typography and beyond.

Display is organized and designed by Kind Company, an independent web and print design office in Brooklyn, New York. Alongside client work, KindCo engages in self-initiated graphic design history projects. Their websites for the Alvin Lustig Archive and Helvetica and the New York City Subway System help generate inspiration and awareness about graphic design history, pioneers and artifacts. Partners – Greg D’Onofrio and Patricia Belen – are practicing designers, graphic design history enthusiasts, collectors and aspiring writers.

Chicago Design Museum

June 1 – June 30, 2012

By any chance if you find yourself in Chicago, The Chicago Design Museum is open from June 1-30, 2012, in a 6,000 sq./ft. location in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood. CHIDM will host five exhibitions drawn from local, domestic and international sources. CHIDM will also be hosting events for students and professionals, presented within the context of our curated exhibitions. There is no fee to attend the museum, but there is a suggested $10 donation per visit.

The Chicago Design Museum hosts limited engagement exhibitions that focus on design excellence. It adapts to curated collections, and finds the appropriate environment for the work on display. The formality of a traditional museum is still found within the high standards of the curated work, while the pop-up format promotes intimate experiences that are less likely to be found in a brick-and-mortar institution.

The Chicago Design Museum is a collaborative effort between Mark Dudlik and Tanner Woodford, and is part of Lost Creature: a non-profit 501(c)(3) that aims to bridge culture and creativity with community projects.

Moonrise Kingdom

 

 

 

Not all the films credits include the book cover artists of the film. Moonrise Kingdom does.

Wes Anderson’s latest film is a total design piece from its book covers to trucking cameras. The Francine Odysseys book-clutch by Olympia Le-Tan. (The original book jacket was designed by Juman Malouf especially for Wes Anderson’s film Moonrise Kingdom).

Reflagged from olympialetan.

http://www.moonrisekingdom.com

Design in the Service of Subversion

Article on ‘Graphic Design: Now in Production’ on Governors Island on NY Times

By MARTHA SCHWENDENER
Published: May 31, 2012

A person working in almost any field could have written a book like “How to Be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul”: designers don’t have a monopoly on worker alienation, after all. But that title of Adrian Shaughnessy’s 2005 book reflects the special circumstances of graphic designers, who generally practice their art in the service of clients and commerce.

How much soul was or wasn’t lost in various acts of creation is not the ostensible point of “Graphic Design: Now in Production,” an exhibition, at Building 110 on Governors Island, of posters, books, magazines, typography, branding and film and television graphics created since 2000. And yet this theme underlies virtually every aspect of the show, which was organized by Andrew Blauvelt of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis and Ellen Lupton of the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, and which vacillates between design made for industry and design that critiques it.

The catalog is oriented toward the latter, and toward a view of design as a force for social change. Inspired by “The Last Whole Earth Catalog,” a ’70s guide to off-the-grid living, it includes essays like Ms. Lupton’s “Designer as Producer,” a quasi-retooling of Walter Benjamin’s “Author as Producer” (1934) — which encouraged artists and writers to transform their mediums in order to turn passive consumers into active producers — and a piece by the Dutch designer Daniel van der Velden that includes an epigraph from Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri’s post-Marxist anti-globalization epic, “Empire” (2000).

Even some of the most corporate designs are displayed in a way that aligns them with counterculture. The wall label introducing Google Doodles, the changing home page logos of that Internet behemoth, describes how the first one, in 1998, was meant “as a message to users that the founders were ‘out of the office’ attending the Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert.” Examples here, shown on small video screens, include illustrated commemorations of Earth Day and John Lennon’s birthday.

A before-and-after display of redesigned corporate logos, including those of Pfizer and Starbucks, as well as the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library, incorporates a device recognizable to those familiar with contemporary art history: a polling system with plexiglass boxes in which viewers place chips to vote on their preferred versions. The display recalls Hans Haacke’s “Poll” art works, like “MoMA Poll” (1970), in which viewers were asked to register their opinions of Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, a MoMA trustee, and his position on the Vietnam War. (Mr. Haake has said the work essentially got him banned from exhibiting at the museum for the next three decades.)

Avant-garde practices also inform a series of posters created for the exhibition by the Amsterdam design firm Experimental Jetset. The works borrow heavily from the French affichistes of the ’50s and ’60s, who appropriated torn posters from the streets, and the ’70s British punk designer Jamie Reid, famous for his Sex Pistols record covers. A quotation from Walter Benjamin’s “Arcades Project” (1927-40) on one of the posters compares the experience of viewing a cluttered commercial landscape to reading while stoned on hashish.

Books and magazines offer some of the most compelling designs here. David Pearson’s covers for books on the Penguin Press backlist, like Thomas More’s “Utopia” and Freud’s “Wolfman,” and Angus Hyland’s books of the Bible retool the canon for contemporary readers. Underground magazines like Manzine, The Gentlewoman and Sup Magazine spoof mainstream genres like men’s, women’s, and hipster-lifestyle magazines. Even typefaces, several examples of which are displayed on placards around the show, are treated as insurrectionary: Aktiv Grotesk, designed by Dalton Maag in 2010, is described as “a head-on challenge to the ‘over-hyped Helvetica.’ ”

Projects in which designers use their skills to turn information into more art-like objects and installations, away from the gaze of the client, make a more believable case for design’s radical potential. Kai Krause’s “True Size of Africa” (2010) is a map in which various non-African countries are fitted into an outline of the continent to offer a sense of Africa’s enormous size and, by extension, of its underrepresentation in geopolitics and world economics. Christopher Doyle’s “Identity Guidelines” (2008) is a series of self-portrait photos and texts that parodies fashion and personal branding, while the fake military patches that make up Trevor Paglen’s “Symbology (Volume I)” (2006) mimic the scary self-seriousness of classified intelligence units. “Facestate” (2011) by Dutch designers Metahaven is a canny if visually underwhelming kiosk installation that critiques social media as a method of surveillance and social control.

Works like these remind you that graphic designers possess a powerful skill set: the ability to persuade with images and text. What they actually do with these weapons of mass seduction is another story, however. The art critic Arthur Danto once suggested that American graphic designers helped win the cold war, since their products looked better on store shelves than their drab communist counterparts.

The subject of design in a utopian society is brought up in the catalog by Dmitri Siegel, who asks, “What would be the role of the designer in a truly do-it-yourself economy?” He offers Flickr, YouTube and MySpace as provisional examples; a series of eco-conscious Green Patriot Posters installed near the bathrooms suggests a darker, more dystopian view.

Within the exhibition context, design can easily be presented as utopian. It is striking, however, that from the building where this show is installed you can see, just across the water, the towers of Wall Street — a center of global capital, but also the physical and spiritual locus of the Occupy movement, which so far has barely tapped the radical power of graphic design.

“Graphic Design: Now in Production” is open weekends and holiday Mondays through Sept. 3 in Building 110 on Governors Island; (212) 849-8400, cooperhewitt.org.

A version of this review appeared in print on June 1, 2012, on page C21 of the New York edition with the headline: Design in the Service of Subversion.

Not Amazing and not Groundbreaking but Really Very Decently Good Typography

Friday, June 1st
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

A Talk at the Cooper Union, NYC

This is sure to be a fantastic talk from a smart and talented designer, co-author of “Graphic Design Referenced” and the blog Under Consideration.
The cost is $15 for student non-TDC members.
Grab your design friends/classmates and head to New York for this not-to-be-missed event

Graphic Design—Now in Production

May 26 – Sept 3, 2012

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Open weekends and holiday Mondays, 10am to 6pm
Building 110, Governors Island, New York. (Directions and free ferry schedule)

Free Admission.
Co-organized by Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and the Walker Art Center, Graphic Design—Now in Production explores some of the most vibrant sectors and genres of graphic design today.

The rise of user-generated content, alternative methods of printing and distribution, and the wide dissemination of creative software have opened up new opportunities for design. Featuring works produced since 2000, Graphic Design explores the worlds of design-driven magazines, newspapers, books, and posters; the expansion of branding programs for corporations, subcultures and nations; the entrepreneurial spirit of designer-produced goods; the renaissance in digital typeface design; the storytelling potential of film and television titling sequences; and the transformation of raw data into compelling information narratives.

Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language

May 6 – August 27, 2012

The exhibition is divided into two sections, with the first featuring an abbreviated timeline of language in modern art culled primarily from drawings, sculptures, prints, books, and sound works from MoMA’s collection. Artists in this historical section of the exhibition include: Carl Andre, Marcel Broodthaers, Henri Chopin, Marcel Duchamp, Ian Hamilton Finlay, John Giorno, Kitasono Katue, Ferdinand Kriwet, Liliane Lijn, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Bruce Nauman, Lawrence Weiner, and others. Artists in the contemporary section of the exhibition include: Ei Arakawa/Nikolas Gambaroff, Tauba Auerbach, Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey), Trisha Donnelly, Shannon Ebner, Paul Elliman, Experimental Jetset, Sharon Hayes, Karl Holmqvist, Paulina Olowska, Adam Pendleton, and Nora Schultz. The exhibition is accompanied by a publication designed and produced by Dexter Sinister.

The Happy Show by Stefan Sagmeister

April 4 – August 12, 2012

Graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister not only tests the boundary between art and design, he often transgresses it through his imaginative implementation of typography. Filling the Institute of Contemporary Art’s (ICA) entire second-floor galleries and Ramp, and activating the in-between spaces of the museum,The Happy Show offers visitors the experience of walking into the designer’s mind as he attempts to increase his happiness via mediation, cognitive therapy, and mood-altering pharmaceuticals. “I am usually rather bored with definitions,” Sagmeister says. “Happiness, however, is just such a big subject that it might be worth a try to pin it down.” Centered around the designer’s ten-year exploration of happiness, this exhibition presents typographic investigations of a series of maxims, or rules to live by, originally culled from Sagmeister’s diary, manifested in a variety of imaginative and interactive forms. The Happy Showopens on Wednesday, April 4, 2012 with a reception from 6–8pm, and will remain on view through August 12, 2012.

art.design@mgsa.rutgers.edu | New Brunswick, NJ