Design Practicum Fall 2019 Animations on The Anthropocene Screened in Istanbul

December 2019, Istanbul

The anthropocene is a term that describes the current geological era. This term describes a period in which humanity is the leading force in geologically shaping the planet earth. While some scientists argue that this era began with organized agriculture in the 16th century, there are different views on its beginning, some associate it with the industrial revolution in the 19th century, or some argue that this era began in the 20th century in parallel with nuclear history. Regardless of the beginning of this period, today, climate change, which is one of the most catastrophic consequences of the present anthropocene era, is the top priority of the global agenda.

11 young designers who were in the Design Practicum class at Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University, in the state of New Jersey lead by design professor Atif Akin, approached this historical concept from different point of views and all visualized quantitative or encyclopedic data to create poetic meaning in the context of short animations. From microplastics to chicken bones, from political protocols to microscopic imaging techniques, from plastic bags to melting glaciers, they designed animations ranging from 30 to 60 seconds each. These animations are displayed at a whale size 39 feet LED screen at the Zorlu Performance Center in Istanbul

Katie Makar visualizes the sound recordings of the melting glaciers in the form of a wave and also points out the relationship between the melting glaciers and the rising sea level. Conor Finn deals with the aesthetics of the crisis screens of computer operating systems, adapting it to an animation that criticizes the environmental stalemate of the planet and its policies. Although it does not seem to have a very important place in the seriousness of the subject, 60 billion chickens produced and consumed each year and their bones are important in anthropocene research in the academic field. Taking this into account, Maya Tillman visualizes this striking data in fast food aesthetics. Francesca Stoppa, on the other hand, draws attention to the particle density in the atmosphere by acting with the data published by NASA in 2019. Animations there is also a small Turkish surprise inside, in limiting the use of plastic bags in Turkey, the United States a lot of the state from the early measures taken has learned that Sara Reed slightest a Turkish proverb, using the iconic New York plastic bag design. Tyler Lee not only experimented with electromicroscopic images that imply the technological advancement of humanity in. Poetic way, he also designed and implemented the visual identity of the project on behalf of his classmates. Elyssa Feerrar changes our point of view from the surface to the deep ocean and she created a cartoony looking dystopic underwater ocean view. While Jennifer Aguirre points our attention to urban deforestation, she uses images from both New York and Istanbul high rises. Both Lau Krystal and Jillian Mulhern were so much interested in the risk of microplastic pollution in the oceans, they took different ways of visualizing the phenomenon, while Jillian was interested in the consumer products Lau chose to literally and visually represent the microparticles on this whale size screen. Rushika Raman visualized number of chemical substances used in the plastic industry and their IUPAC names in a typographic animation that all started with “Poly-“.

For this international collaboration, organized by Deniz Akgüllü, director of digilogue sponsored by Zorlu Holding, we found this concept worth considering and scrutinizing as it is an issue of equal concern to everyone on the planet, from Istanbul to New Brunswick, New Jersey.  

You can also view and download the whole animation in its original format:

Publication Intensive

Application

Please apply via our online form, here. The deadline for applications is midnight on Monday, April 11, 2016. Participants will be notified no later than Friday, April 15. If you have further questions, please write edu@canopycanopycanopy.com. Read a conversation between participants in 2014’s program here.

What: A two-week program in the history and contemporary practice of publication.

Where: At Triple Canopy’s offices in Brooklyn and various arts spaces around New York City.

Cost: Tuition is free, though participants must arrange and pay for their travel and accommodation. All reading and viewing materials will be provided free of cost.

Triple Canopy is pleased to announce its second Publication Intensive, a two-week program in the history and contemporary practice of publication, for twelve higher-level college students, graduate students, and recent college graduates. We invite applications from prospective students with backgrounds in areas such as writing, art, literature, art history, new media, and design. During the Publication Intensive, Triple Canopy editors and invited artists, writers, and technologists will lead discussions and workshops with participating students, who will research, analyze, and enact an approach to publication that hinges on today’s networked forms of production and circulation but also mines the history of print culture and artistic practice. The program will take place at Triple Canopy’s venue in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and will include visits to studios of artists and designers, archives, and cultural institutions.

“The Winners and Losers of History: The Emergence of Japanese Modernism in Graphic Design”

On Monday evening Jason’s Seminar in Design class will be hosting a guest lecture by Ian Lynam, a Tokyo-based designer, educator, and writer. Ian will be presenting on “The Winners and Losers of History: The Emergence of Japanese Modernism in Graphic Design”. Here are the details and a bio:

Monday, February 1
6:30–8pm
Room 218C

Originally hailing from New York, Lynam has a BS in Graphic Design from Portland State University and an MFA in Graphic Design from CalArts.

Ian Lynam is Chair and faculty at Vermont College of Fine Arts in the MFA Graphic Design program. He is faculty in Tokyo at Meme Design School. Ian is also adjunct faculty at Temple University Japan. There, he teaches in the Undergraduate program, actively engaged in developing curricula concerning typography, graphic design, image-making, identity design, UI/UX and motion graphics.

Currently, Ian writes for Idea Magazine(Japan) and Slanted Magazine(Germany). He is a co-founder of Néojaponisme, a critical cultural online journal.

Dear Design Student

Why is so much of design school a waste of time?

by Juliette Cezzar

on deardesignstudent.com

Q: My teacher hates everything I make, even though I spend all this time working on it, and gets mad even when I follow his advice. Sometimes designers who are working come to talk to us, but they never get what I’m trying to do. There’s all this useless talking when they should just teach us things. Should I just quit school and go work somewhere? I feel like this is a waste of time.

Dear design student,

Sure, you can leave, but you’re going to take your inability to use criticism with you. And then you will be back here in about six months asking why your clients keep getting in your way or whether or not you should go find a better job with smarter people. So my advice is that if you can, stay where you are for as long as it takes for you to figure this out. You don’t have to go to school to figure out how to give and receive criticism, but it’s mostly what happens in school, so it’s a good place to practice.

I was terrible at it, so I didn’t even begin to figure it out until I was halfway through graduate school. Critics would come up from New York and the most I could get out of them were expressions of sympathy or open frustration. They would get away as soon as it was politely possible and sneak back to the desk of my then best friend and mortal enemy, scribbling down their phone numbers and breathlessly asking if they could talk more with him later.
This made no sense to me. Especially early on, his work was half-baked and sometimes awful. But over two years, he became ten times the designer he was when he started, while I was pretty much in the same place. And I watched him do it. When people came to his desk, everything about his expression and body language said “tell me more,” as if the critic was spoon-feeding him ice cream rather than telling him everything that was wrong with his work. As for me, I was set on being me, which meant tearing the work apart before anyone else could, offering up detailed excuses to fill the time, and arguing with my critics, building my case that I was smarter than them anyway, since they clearly didn’t get what I was doing. And I spent the rest of my time complaining that maaaybe ten percent of what they said was useful, when in my mind, the yield should have been far closer to one hundred percent.
So here’s the secret that I didn’t put into practice until after I graduated: you’re a gold miner, not a customer, and if you don’t get good at mining for gold, you will never be a good designer. Especially once you make it past the first year or two of working, you spend less time wrestling with making things and more time listening to people in person, on the phone, in slack, in texts, in email, pretty much everywhere where they can find you. They are redundant, inarticulate, inefficient, vague, and inconsistent, and they are constantly going on and on about something. And god bless them. They don’t owe you clarity. If ten percent of what they say is useful, that’s a win. Your job as a student is to practice figuring out which ten percent is useful, how to mine it, and how to use it. This is what school is for. If you want to learn how to use digital tools, talk to the internet.

You’re also thinking here that success in a critique means that people like what you made, and that success in the next critique is showing how obedient you are in following their suggestions. You’re missing the point. It’s a gift exchange, not an oral exam, and if you don’t get past this in school, you will be condemned to repeat it after you leave. You’ll go to one client meeting and walk out mad that they didn’t like what you made, then you’ll grumpily make their suggestions real and bring them in for the next round, and get mad again when they still don’t like it. You will complain to your friends about “pushing pixels” and how dumb clients are. And you will be as good a designer at 32 as you were at 22, maybe slightly worse.
You have to let go of sorting people into “good” people who like what you do and “bad” people who don’t, and you have to start to seek out people who don’t see things exactly as you do. The hero in your life is never going to be the person who pats you on the head: it’s going to be the person who puts their own need to be liked aside to make you a better designer. And no, someone doesn’t need to understand you or your project 100% before they have the right to say anything about it. The person who doesn’t get you or what you made is the one that is most likely to come up with the idea or the insight that you can’t come up with on your own. People who see things differently are gold.

So next time someone is giving you feedback about something you made, think to yourself that to win means getting two or three insights, ideas, or suggestions that you are excited about, and that you couldn’t think up on your own. Lead the conversation until you get there. Ask real questions that tell you something that you didn’t know already. Say “tell me more.” Let them wander, tell stories, not understand, be irrelevant — take as long as it takes to listen for the pieces that make you better.

And if they are hard on you, keep coming back to them. As my favorite client once said to someone working for him, “Is this it? Is this as good as you want to be? Are you done? Because if you are done, and you don’t want to be any better, I can stop talking. But if you’re not, I’m here for you.”

Juliette Cezzar is a designer, educator, and author based in New York City. She is currently the Associate Director of BFA Communication Design at The New School’s Parsons School of Design and President of AIGA/NY. Her most recent book, with Sue Apfelbaum, is Designing the Editorial Experience.

Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game extended

Film stills courtesy of the Herbert Matter World Game Archive at Stanford University Libraries.
Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation
Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game extended
September 18—November 20, 2015

Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery
Buell Hall, Columbia University GSAPP
1172 Amsterdam Ave
New York, NY 10027
Hours: Monday–Friday noon–6pm, Saturday 3–6pm

Columbia GSAPP Exhibitions presents Information Fall-Out: Buckminster Fuller’s World Game, an exhibition at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation.

Initially proposed for Expo 67 in Montréal, Buckminster Fuller’s World Game was played for the first time in 1969 at the New York Studio School for Drawing, Painting, and Sculpture. Over the next decade, the World Game evolved and expanded through workshops, seminars, strategy papers, and building designs. Across its different manifestations, the World Game remained focused on the goals of overcoming energy scarcity and altering conventional territorial politics through the redistribution of world resources. This anti-Malthusian, anti-war game was meant to discover conditions for perpetual ecological peace and to usher in a new era of total global resource consciousness. Mirroring Cold War command and control infrastructures, proposals for World Game centers described a vast computerized network that could process, map, and visualize environmental information drawn from, among other sources, Russian and American spy satellites. Fuller claimed that their optical sensors and thermographic scanners could detect the location and quantity of water, grain, metals, livestock, human populations, or any other conceivable form of energy. Among Fuller’s abiding obsessions was the limited range of the electromagnetic spectrum available to human vision. Fuller argued that the World Game would serve as a corrective to this limitation by rendering visible global environmental data patterns that evaded normal perception.

Assembling documents related to various iterations of the World Game conceived, proposed, and played from 1964 to 1982 along with materials from the World Resources Inventory, the exhibition examines the World Game as an experimental pedagogical project, as a system for environmental information, and as a process of resource administration. A related symposium will bring together scholars and architects with Fuller partners and collaborators to speak about the World Game in relation to its ecological, informational vision, and to the current stakes for environmental data and its representation.

The exhibition is curated and designed by Mark Wasiuta, Director of Exhibitions and Co-Director of the Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture Program, and Adam Bandler, Exhibitions Coordinator at Columbia GSAPP. Florencia Alvarez Pacheco is assistant curator.

For more information, please send an email to exhibitions@arch.columbia.edu.

The Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP), provides a platform for developing original curatorial projects and for experimenting with the spatial distribution and visual organization of research material. The gallery is simultaneously a testing ground for exploring new approaches to architectural exhibitions, and a space for considering and analyzing architecture as it has been formed through exhibition. Its exhibition program follows several distinct series. “The Living Archive” interrogates and exposes important and underexamined architectural archives, while other exhibitions resulting from collaboration with contemporary artists, architects, and scholars aim to provide models for novel forms of architectural speculation and spatial practice.

Bierut Show in NYC — Must See Before Nov 7!

Make sure to see Graphic designer Michael Bierut’s exhibition at the SVA Chelsea Galleries, up now through Nov 7. You will see a coherent body of thoughtful work, including logos, visual identity systems, posters, books, way-finding and building signage, as well as pages from the designer’s sketchbook, a video interview and a roomful of black-and-white posters for the Yale School of Architecture. Absolutely gorgeous! Read an interview with the designer here.

Banknote design from Norway

Norges Bank has announced that designs by two Oslo studios have been chosen to feature on Norway’s new banknotes, which will come into circulation in 2017. Snøhetta’s design for the reverse of the notes features a pixellated image of the country’s coastline, the amount of distortion depicting the wind speed as it whips up with each denomination…

Earlier this year, eight designers were invited to submit proposals for Norway’s new banknote design on the theme of ‘the sea’. Today, the central bank of Norway announced that designs by The Metric System and Snøhetta will be used on the obverse (full set shown bottom of post) and reverse sides of the banknotes, respectively.

CENTURY: 100 YEARS OF TYPE IN DESIGN

May 1, 2014-June 18, 2014

On view at the AIGA National Design Center (May 1–June 18)
Interest in type, typefaces, typography and fonts has grown far beyond the graphic design community, yet few truly understand how and why these vital components of design are created and applied. This exhibition, organized by Monotype and designed by AIGA Medalist and Pentagram partner Abbott Miller for the AIGA National Design Center, celebrates 100 years of type as a constant influence in the world around us.

Gathering rare and unique works from premier archives in the United States and London, “Century” will serve as the hub of a series of presentations, workshops and events held at the AIGA gallery as well as the Type Directors Club and the Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography at Cooper Union in New York City. The “Century” exhibition features a range of artifacts representing the evolution from typeface conception to fonts in use. Typeface production drawings by the preeminent designers of the last 100 years, proofs, type posters and announcement broadsides are supplemented by publications, advertising, ephemera and packaging.

Richard Hollis

This event has no image but a special remark from Gerry, I’d definitely consider attending.
http://artistsspace.org/exhibitions/richard-hollis/
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September 21 – November 10, 2013
Opening: Friday, September 20, 6 – 8pm

Artists Space : Books & Talks
55 Walker Street

British graphic designer Richard Hollis (born London, 1934) is a seminal figure in postwar design and communication. Working consistently since the 1950s as a freelance designer, Hollis has also authored influential books on design history and theory. His practice has placed emphasis on close collaboration with those commissioning his design, including writers, editors, artists, curators and architects. An overriding concern for the effective and economic communication of the client’s message has been consistent throughout his work.

This exhibition, curated by design historian Emily King with designer Stuart Bailey, is the first overview of Hollis’ work in the US. Consisting of over 150 items drawn from the designer’s personal archive including finished pieces, layouts, and notes, it reflects his entire professional life. Hollis was greatly influenced in the 1950s and 60s by travels to Zurich, Paris and Cuba, his production during this time revealing the impact of Swiss modernist design and Concrete art, alongside that of left-wing politics. In the mid-1960s he co-founded with Norman Potter a new School of Design at West England College of Art, based on experimental teaching principles, and worked as art director and designer of journals including New Society and Modern Poetry in Translation, the last of which Hollis went on to design for a period of 40 years.

Over these four decades, Hollis also worked for numerous publishers, including freelance for Penguin, and as art director at the left-wing publisher Pluto Press. In 1972 Hollis was one of the team of five that produced the book of John Berger’s BBC TV series Ways of Seeing. This significant project crystallized ideas around the ideological function of visual images, forming a critique of representation that was extended into the innovative relations between image and text in the publication. Hollis also collaborated with Berger on the design of the novel G. (1972) and the study of migrant workers A Seventh Man (1975), produced with the photographer Jean Mohr.

For a period of seven years in the 1970s and 80s, Hollis worked for the Whitechapel Gallery in London establishing a coherent system of communication for the gallery that has subsequently become a touchstone for the manner in which art institutions adopt a graphic identity. Since then he has worked for many other public and private art galleries, and along the way forged long-standing relationships and collaborations with several artists, most significantly British Op artist Bridget Riley. Consistent across his five decades of work as a designer has been a commitment to writing on design, including the key text Graphic Design: A Concise History, published by Thames & Hudson in 1994, and Swiss Graphic Design published by Laurence King in 2006. His writing for magazines, journals and newspapers, alongside letters and lecture outlines, have recently been compiled into About Graphic Design, published by Occasional Papers in April 2012.

Richard Hollis is curated by Emily King with Stuart Bailey. Exhibition furniture design by Simon Jones. The exhibition was first presented at Gallery Libby Sellers, London, in 2012, and toured to ECAL, Lausanne and Centre Pompidou, Paris.

Related Programs:

A Video Lecture
Richard Hollis
Sunday, September 22, 3pm

The Truth About Hollis
Stuart Bailey
Thursday, September 26, 7pm

This exhibition is supported by Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; The New York State Council on the Arts, a State Agency; public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in partnership with the City Council; and The Friends of Artists Space.

http://artistsspace.org/exhibitions/richard-hollis/

Story I Graphic Design Conference

Designers are creators, yet must also respond to the needs of their clients. Is there a tension between a designer’s self-expression and the success of their enterprise? How do designers address this tension, if it exists? The goal of this conference is twofold: to inspire attendees to think critically about the role of self-expression within design, and to give an opportunity for speakers to reflect on their personal journeys as designers.

Story, Princeton University’s fifth-annual graphic design conference, invites celebrated designers along with students and faculty members from all across the nation to confront these questions.

http://www.princetonsda.com/story/

Fresh Blood IV

If you have any thoughts of attending a graduate program in design down the road, this upcoming AIGA event might be a great way to see what students are doing at various schools.  At the SVA Theatre in NYC, students from MICA, NYU Interactive, Parsons, Pratt, RISD, the School of Visual Arts, Cranbrook and Yale will gather present their projects. Tickets are $10 for AIGA members, $30 for non-members. So maybe this is the time to join AIGA. See the benefits list and join as a Contributor for $50. Choose New York or Philadelphia as your chapter. You’ll have a chance to indicate you are a student; we are on the school list as “Rutgers University — New Brunswick”.

GDUSA’s Most Influential Designers

Graphic Design USA magazine announced its survey of the most influential graphic designers working today. Take a look at the list, and the work of these significant contemporary designers throughout the country. Do you agree with their choices?

There are several other parts of this 50th Anniversary survey, including their picks for Most Influential Corporate Design Department and Most Influential Ad Agency.

Reinvent Payphones

Today the City of New York manages over 11,000 payphone kiosks across the five boroughs – and we know that with the rise of mobile phones and digital media, the way that New Yorkers share information is changing rapidly. In order to modernize our powerful communications infrastructure, the City of New York is hosting Reinvent Payphones, a public design challenge that seeks to rally urban designers, planners, technologists and policy experts to create physical and/or virtual prototypes that imagine the future of payphones.

Have ideas on how New York City can reinvent payphones to create a safer, healthier, more sustainable, accessible and informed city? Submit your prototype by February 18th and you could help to shape the City’s future.

Design for Social Change

Candy Chang   …   Design 21 Social Design Network   …   Design Ignites Change   …   Design Matters at Art Center, Pasadena CA   …   Design Trust for Public Space   …   Pellegrino Collaborative   …   Project H   …   Part of It   …  Andrew Shea: Designing for Social Change   …   Sappi: Ideas that Matter   …   Social Innovators Collective   …   GALEWiLL Center for Opportunity and Progress

art.design@mgsa.rutgers.edu | New Brunswick, NJ